Job Safety

Following passage of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, safety and health conditions in our nation's workplaces have improved. Workers' lives have been saved and injury and illness rates have dropped in many industry sectors of the economy. However, too many employers continue to cut corners and violate the law, putting workers in serious danger and costing lives. Many hazards remain unregulated. The job safety law needs to be updated to provide protection for all workers who lack coverage and to strengthen enforcement and workers’ rights. It's our job to continue this fight for safe jobs.

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Jun 15, 2020 | Press Release

“No worker in the U.S. should face discrimination in the workplace because of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

With this ruling, millions of workers will finally have protections regardless of who controls their state government.

Jul 20, 2020 | News Story

As NYC continues it's phased reopening, we urge elected officials keep in mind America's Five Economic Essentials:

Keep front-line workers safe and secure. 

Keep workers employed and protect earned pension checks.

Jun 4

Join the United Federation of Teachers and the NYC Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO for a virtual fair for NYC high school students to explore careers in union jobs.

Apr 23, 2020 | News Story

Each and every day of this crisis, union members on the frontlines of the COVID-19 outbreak are bravely going to work, putting their health and lives on the line for their fellow New Yorkers.

Every ten years since 1890, the federal government sets out to count every person living in the United States. The Decennial Census as it is called, will take place between March through June of 2020. 

Mar 26, 2020 | Press Release

On behalf of the New York City labor movement at the epicenter of the COVID-19 crisis, I’d like to extend thanks to United States Senator Charles Schumer for his tireless work on the stimulus bill.

Mar 25, 2020 | Press Release

Today, we mark the 109th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, a catastrophic event in which 146 workers, mostly young immigrant women, were killed as a direct result of abhorrent working conditions and woefully insufficient workplace safety standards.