Retirement Security

Fewer employers today provide defined-benefit pensions for their workers—and among those that do, many are offering “defined-contribution” (like 401[k]s) rather than traditional “defined-benefit” pension plans.

That’s why Social Security insurance is essential for millions of retirees. Nearly two-thirds of retirees count on Social Security for half or more of their retirement income and for more than three in 10, Social Security is 90 percent or more of their income. It is a safety net that keeps retirees out of poverty.

It’s also important to figure out what you will need to retire. Talking a look at how much Social Security will provide, whether you have another form of pension and how much you spend are all components in determining when you can retire.

For decades, workers achieved retirement security because their retirement income flowed from a combination of employer-provided pensions, Social Security and personal savings. But the recession has exposed the severe deficiencies in our retirement system. We need to develop a new way to provide workers with lifetime retirement security beyond Social Security.

More about this issue:

Jan 26, 2024 | News Story

The Onion Union announced that 97% of their 35-member bargaining unit signed a pledge to strike if they do not reach a fair agreement with parent company G/O Media before their contract expires on January 31.

Jan 26, 2024 | News Story

Journalists at New York’s Hometown Newspaper, the Daily News, walked out Thursday — the first walkout since the end of their historic strike in 1991 — fed up with chronic cuts ordered by the paper’s owner, the ‘destroyer of newspapers’ Alden Global Capital.

Jan 26, 2024 | News Story

CIR members at NYC H+H are in contract negotiations with the city and haven't seen any movement that would give members a fair contract. The current proposal on the table would make CIR members in NYC's public sector hospitals the lowest-paid resident physicians in the city.

Feb 7

CIR members at NYC H+H are in contract negotiations with the city and haven't seen any movement that would give members a fair contract. The current proposal on the table would make CIR members in NYC's public sector hospitals the lowest-paid resident physicians in the city.

Feb 7

CIR members at NYC H+H are in contract negotiations with the city and haven't seen any movement that would give members a fair contract. The current proposal on the table would make CIR members in NYC's public sector hospitals the lowest-paid resident physicians in the city.

Feb 2

CIR members at NYC H+H are in contract negotiations with the city and haven't seen any movement that would give members a fair contract. The current proposal on the table would make CIR members in NYC's public sector hospitals the lowest-paid resident physicians in the city.

Feb 1

CIR members at NYC H+H are in contract negotiations with the city and haven't seen any movement that would give members a fair contract. The current proposal on the table would make CIR members in NYC's public sector hospitals the lowest-paid resident physicians in the city.

Feb 1

CIR members at NYC H+H are in contract negotiations with the city and haven't seen any movement that would give members a fair contract. The current proposal on the table would make CIR members in NYC's public sector hospitals the lowest-paid resident physicians in the city.

Jan 31

CIR members at NYC H+H are in contract negotiations with the city and haven't seen any movement that would give members a fair contract. The current proposal on the table would make CIR members in NYC's public sector hospitals the lowest-paid resident physicians in the city.

Jan 31

CIR members at NYC H+H are in contract negotiations with the city and haven't seen any movement that would give members a fair contract. The current proposal on the table would make CIR members in NYC's public sector hospitals the lowest-paid resident physicians in the city.